The Chair and the Desk, 10/5/15

From the chair:

3  The voice of the Lord is over the waters; 
the God of glory thunders, 
the Lord, over many waters. 
4  The voice of the Lord is powerful; 
the voice of the Lord is full of majesty.

-Psalm 29:3-4

We each face a question each day: How will we respond to what God has said? He has declared his power; he has also declared his intense love. Has God’s speaking seized your attention yet today?


From the desk:

“…the decisive question for Christian existence is not whether and how man…can be ‘himself’ and can maintain his own identity and continuity with himself. The point of reference of his expressions and renunciations, his activities and sufferings, it not a transcendental Ego upon which he could and must repeatedly reflect in the midst of all his distractions. But the point of reference is his call. It is to this, and not to himself, that he seeks to live. It is this that gives him identity and continuity—even, and indeed precisely, where he expends himself in non-identity. He does not require to preserve himself by himself, in constant unity with himself, but in surrendering himself to the work of mission he is preserved by the hope inherent in that mission.”

-Jürgen Moltmann, Theology of Hope, 1967 english ed., pp.214-215

I love this quote because it reminds me that I have not been thrown into this life to find myself. I am here to find the one who made me, and he is calling me, with a word of promise, into a future that I have not yet seen, that I believe in and hope for, that I can start to demonstrate and create in the world today.


“The chair” is the one Annie aptly chose for the corner of our living room, and it’s where I am committed to daily hearing from God’s Word–the Word I above all else hope to speak to others. “The desk” is the one by my coffee grounds and spare charger (if I get to the library early enough); it’s where I have the privilege of reading and thinking all day, where I intend to learn for others’ sake.

The Chair and the Desk, 10/2/15

From the chair:

“So then you are no longer strangers and aliens, but you are fellow citizens with the saints and members of the household of God, built on the foundation of the apostles and prophets, Christ Jesus himself being the cornerstone, in whom the whole structure, being joined together, grows into a holy temple in the Lord.”

-Ephesians 2:19-21

One great challenge of faith is to believe that we are something we appear not to be, that we are what God calls us, that we are the household, the temple of God, where God dwells and is worshiped.


From the desk:

“Hence it is on the difference between hope and bodily reality that the wide open, future character of the Christian hope depends. The cosmic ideas of Christian eschatology are therefore not by any means mythological, but reach forward into the open realm of possibilities ahead of all reality, give expression to the ‘expectation of the creature’ for a nova creatio, and provide a prelude for eternal life, peace and the haven of the reconciliation of all things.”

-Jürgen Moltmann, Theology of Hope, 1967 english ed., pp.214-215

I’ve read too many authors lately who say, “Well, people don’t rise from the dead, so we’re not talking about Jesus rising from the dead, so what might ‘Jesus rose from the dead’ mean?” I prefer Moltmann’s approach here: People don’t rise from the dead, but Jesus rose from the dead, so what does that mean? It means that the future is not limited to what “people do,” and in that we have great hope.


“The chair” is the one Annie aptly chose for the corner of our living room, and it’s where I am committed to daily hearing from God’s Word–the Word I above all else hope to speak to others. “The desk” is the one by my coffee grounds and spare charger (if I get to the library early enough); it’s where I have the privilege of reading and thinking all day, where I intend to learn for others’ sake.

The Chair and the Desk, 10/1/15

From the chair:

17 “As for you, my flock, thus says the Lord God: Behold, I judge between sheep and sheep, between rams and male goats. 18 Is it not enough for you to feed on the good pasture, that you must tread down with your feet the rest of your pasture; and to drink of clear water, that you must muddy the rest of the water with your feet? 19 And must my sheep eat what you have trodden with your feet, and drink what you have muddied with your feet? 

20 “Therefore, thus says the Lord God to them: Behold, I, I myself will judge between the fat sheep and the lean sheep. 21 Because you push with side and shoulder, and thrust at all the weak with your horns, till you have scattered them abroad, 22 I will rescue my flock; they shall no longer be a prey. And I will judge between sheep and sheep. 23 And I will set up over them one shepherd, my servant David, and he shall feed them: he shall feed them and be their shepherd. 24 And I, the Lord, will be their God, and my servant David shall be prince among them. I am the Lord; I have spoken. 

-Ezekiel 34:17-24

Just because we can do something doesn’t mean we should. Just because we can have a certain amount doesn’t mean we should. Just because we can live a certain way doesn’t mean we should. In this passage, God does take sides, rescuing the lean sheep from the fat sheep that always pushed them out of the way.


From the desk:

“Where the bounds that mark the end of all human hope are broken through in the raising of the crucified one, there faith can and must expand into hope.”

-Jürgen Moltmann, Theology of Hope, 1967 english ed., p.20

I’ve been looking forward to Moltmann all semester because I didn’t take in the significance of his visit to Seattle Pacific University during my freshman year there. I’ve anticipated this remedial reading, honestly, to have another name to drop in classroom discussions. However, I found a lot more than that in Moltmann: I found a sharp scholar who considers the resurrection essential to Christianity–I’m excited to keep working through this book!


“The chair” is the one Annie aptly chose for the corner of our living room, and it’s where I am committed to daily hearing from God’s Word–the Word I above all else hope to speak to others. “The desk” is the one by my coffee grounds and spare charger (if I get to the library early enough); it’s where I have the privilege of reading and thinking all day, where I intend to learn for others’ sake.